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Fitness myths: the bad, the misunderstood and the absolute worst

One of my most favorite things to do is BUST the ever living shit out of fitness myths. I grew up in gyms, the young girl who marched into the weights section with all the dudes and just figured it out. I never quite knew what I was doing but my dance background helped me understand general alignment. I became a trainer in my 20s and eventually got my Doctorate in Physical Therapy, and have made a career out of correcting people’s body mechanics. And let me tell you, despite what the fitness world preaches, people’s movement patterns are as whacky as ever. Let’s go right ahead and bust a few myths that drive me absolutely bonkers.

MYTH #1
“In order to protect your lower back, you should tuck your tailbone and keep your lower back pressed into the floor.”
For fucks sake, who made this up? I have a personal story about this. In grad school when I was playing mock PT with my colleagues in a therapeutic
“In order to protect your lower back, you should tuck your tailbone and keep your lower back pressed into the floor.” For fucks sake, who made this up? I have a personal story about this. In grad school when I was playing mock PT with my colleagues in a therapeutic exercise class, I had the patient lay on their back with their knees bent and I slid m hand under their low back. I then said, “press your lower back into my hands.” The professor stopped men and said, “What are you trying to train?” I answered, “the deep core stabilizers.” She said, “what muscle are you contracting when you flatten the low back down?” I responded, “The rectus abdominus.” OOPS. So all that time, when I wanted to be protecting clients from low back pain, I was just asking them to flex their spine and bypass their deep core in favor of their superficial core (the “six pack” muscles). From then on I honed my skills on what is core strength and what is core stability, knowing not just the anatomy of both but how to instruct each. And for some god awful reason, the fitness industry continues to perpetuate the myth that tucking the tailbone protects the back. Maybe if you suffer from arthritis it decompresses the force against the spine, but other than that, there is absolutely NO stability occurring when we do that. The stability comes from the drawing in maneuver, which by the way is tricky to teach and learn, and should be taught with the spine in NEUTRAL. As in, with its NATURAL curvatures IN TACT. Sit on that for a minute.

MYTH #2
“Lifting heavy weight will bulk me up”
Ladies, all my ladies. I call BULLSHIT. The only thing that bulks us up is how we eat in relation to what we burn. Lifting heavy is our birthright, and if you ask

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